NERVE COMPRESSION

-Pectoralis Major-

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NERVE COMPRESSION

-Pectoralis Minor-

After passing through the space between the Anterior Scalene, the Middle Scalene and 1st rib, the "neural wiring" (axons) continues its way towards the upper limb. As those axons pass under the coracoid process of the scapula (finger-like prominence sticking forward) they become susceptible to the hypertonicity of the Pectoralis Minor muscle. As you can see in the images, Mecs Minor inserts at the coracoid process of the scapula.

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Another view of the Pectoralis Muscle.

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Another view of the area.

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NERVE COMPRESSION

-Anterior and Middle Scalenes-

At this point, the "neural wiring" passing through the space between the Anterior Scalene, the Middle Scalene and 1st rib is not called "nerves" yet. This complex section of "neural wiring" is referred to as Brachial Plexus. 

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Another view of the Brachial Plexus.

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Another view of the area.

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There are other muscles that contribute to and are affected by this condition. In order to effectively release the Scalene muscles, it is necessary to release these muscles as well. Here are some images of those muscles. Please, do not forget to include them in your regular releasing routine.

Upper trapezius.

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Sternocleidomastoid muscle. Also known as "SCM".

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Levator Scapula.

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Pectoralis Major.

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The Suboccipitals are a group of 8 muscles found at the base of the skull, they are deeper to the Upper Trapezius. On this picture, the right Obliquus Capitis Inferior (the lowest of them) is highlighted.

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